Together for Biodiversity

Fire Ecology - FIRECOL

     
   

GROUP DESCRIPTION


   
Group Description
 

FIRECOL is a new research line that was formerly integrated in the Forest Ecology (FORECOL) group. FIRECOL leads research with strong emphasis on fire ecology and management, complemented with research on the effects of wildfires on forest dynamics and conservation. The aim of this research line is to provide added value information and guidelines on various aspects of fire to different end users, from landowners and forest managers to policy makers. Research outputs were used to set up national and international scientific networks on wildfire science.

 

Our main focus is extending research in the following research areas:

  1. Fire effects in Mediterranean forest ecosystems: We aim to assess short- to long-term fire effects in vegetation, wildlife, habitats and landscapes, as well as the interactions between fire and several natural and anthropogenic factors, including native and exotic species, herbivory, pests, land-cover and climate. This knowledge will contribute to predict post-fire dynamics and improve the ability to estimate the economic and ecological impacts caused by fire.
  2. Post-fire management and restoration of burned areas: We aim to assess the post-fire recovery of burned forests, and how it can be influenced by different active and passive management techniques. We expect to extent the ability to avoid the negative impacts of fire by managing the land and resources in a sustainable manner.
  3. Wildfire prevention and fire effects mitigation: We aim to improve wildfire prevention and fire effects mitigation for example trough the analysis of the performance of fire prevention systems, the use of fire as a management tool or the mid-to long-term effects of grazing by ungulates on wildfire hazard. FIRECOL work in close association with other research lines (e.g. UESFOR) to address forest fire education and awareness, socio-ecological vulnerability, governance and partnerships for enhancing society resilience to wildfires.

 
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